Wednesday, March 14, 2012

PINK SLIME, MRM's, BSE AKA MAD COW DISEASE, AND THE USDA NSLP

PINK SLIME, MRM’s, BSE AKA MAD COW DISEASE, AND THE USDA NSLP




RICK PERRY EATS A PINK SLIME HAMBURGER, AND LIKES IT, IN FACT, RICK PERRY ENDORSES PINK SLIME BURGERS ;











I remember another fool that showed the same ignorance during the mad cow saga in England.
John Gummer force feeding his daughter a mad cow hamburger. later on in years after that, a close friend of theirs died from mad cow disease.











Family friend of John Gummer is killed by CJD aged 23 By ANDREW LEVY




Last updated at 19:16 11 October 2007







Elizabeth Smith: She learned on her 21st birthday that she had vCJD



A family friend of former Tory agriculture minister John Gummer has died from the human form of mad cow disease.



Elizabeth Smith died last week, more than two years after learning on her 21st birthday that she had new variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.



Her father, retired vicar Roger Smith, is a friend of Mr Gummer, a former parishioner who famously attempted to allay fears about BSE in 1990 when he publicly fed a burger to his four-year-old daughter, Cordelia.



At the time, Mr Gummer said: "I can assure the public there is no cause for concern.



"The Government has taken all the advice it can from the experts. Their conclusion is that beef is perfectly safe."



University student Miss Smith quit her course days after the diagnosis in March 2005 and soon became so ill she needed round-the-clock treatment.



She was 23 when she died at her parents' home. Yesterday, they paid tribute to their "active and intelligent" daughter.



Mr Smith, of St Margaret South Elmham in Suffolk, said: "By the time she came home she had trouble swallowing and then couldn't swallow at all, so for the last two-and-a-half years she was fitted with a gastro-tube.



"After that the disease was remorseless in the way that it killed her off. She was unable to walk for the last two years of her life and couldn't speak or smile.



"Elizabeth had to be cared for 24 hours a day, seven days a week.



It's safe: John Gummer feeds his daughter Cordelia a burger



"She was more helpless for those last two years than when she was born - at least then she could move her arms and cry but by the end she couldn't even do that."



Describing her daughter's 21st birthday, Molly Smith said: "That was the worst time because we all had to cope with the fact that she was going to die.



"Elizabeth was clever, bright and intelligent. If she had been able to do her final exams she would have got a very good degree.



"She wanted to do primary school teaching and had a place on a postgraduate training course."



Miss Smith, who had a brother, Andrew, 39, passed four A-levels before going to Birmingham University in 2002 to read geography.



She first became ill in August 2004 but it was not until seven months later that she was told by doctors she had vCJD.



Mr Smith said yesterday that he was "99.9 per cent certain" that his daughter's illness had been caused by contaminated beef.



But he refused to blame Mr Gummer, saying the episode with the burger had not changed the way he viewed meat.



He added: "One of the few comforting thoughts is that almost certainly Elizabeth's degree of awareness in the last two years of her life was minimal. Some doctors would say that vCJD is far more painful to watch than suffer."



Miss Smith was the 162nd person to die from new variant CJD, which was first identified in 1996 after being linked to an outbreak of BSE (bovine spongiform encephalopathy) in cattle. vCJD slowly destroys the brain, giving it a sponge-like appearance.



It is thought to be caused by the build up in the brain of an abnormal form of the naturally occurring prion protein.



Most cases have developed as a result of eating infected meat, although five victims have been vegetarians. The disease has also been transmitted by blood transfusion and infected surgical equipment.



Mr Gummer was not available for comment yesterday.







http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-487074/Family-friend-John-Gummer-killed-CJD-aged-23.html





Ammonia-treated beef DOES NOT KILL MAD COW DISEASE !!!




Experts say it is likely that bits of spinal cord - the part of a cow most likely to be contaminated with BSE - could be found in mechanically recovered meat.


http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/1482140.stm




Horror of the BSE school dinner risk


by SEAN POULTER, Daily Mail



Large quantities of 'BSE risk' meat sludge found its way into school lunches for up to 15 years.

Some 75,000 tons of mechanically recovered meat (MRM), blasted from the bones of cattle with water jets, was used in economy foods, a study reveals.

A further 150,000 tons of meat from heads, including cheeks and lips, which was later banned as a risk, was used, often in schools and hospitals.

The scandal was exposed yesterday in a report by the Food Standards Agency, which shed new light on the risk to human health of BSE.

The findings horrified families who lost loved ones to CJD, the human form of BSE. Lester Firkins, chairman of the Human BSE Foundation, a charity set up by victims' families, said: 'The fact that this stuff was getting into school dinners is repulsive.

'The average age of those people who have died is 27. We are left wondering whether school dinners was the common factor.

'No sensible parent would knowingly have allowed their children to eat that sort of food.

'You assume that what children are given at school is better than you'd get at a fast-food restaurant. That wasn't the case.

'The schools and other authorities should have made checks about the quality of the food they were using. Even today we do not know exactly what ends up on our plates.'

Mr Firkins lost his son Ellis, a 25-year-old teacher, to CJD last year.

The FSA says that MRM was being fed to humans at the rate of 5,000 tons a year from 1980 to 1995, which covered the years that BSE was rife in cattle.

Head meat was routinely included in economy foods at the rate of 10,000 tons a year for the same period.

Assuming it was used at a rate of around 15 per cent of the contents, the MRM alone could equate to 4.5billion burgers over 15 years.

The study shows that in the late 1980s, every part of the carcass was used in food production.

Frozen brains were exported to France while 'rectums were cleaned and salted and exported to Germany for sausages'.

The FSA suggests that 40 per cent of MRM went into cheap mince, another 40 per cent into economy burgers and the rest to other uses such as pies, sausages and patés.

Some of the MRM, although it is likely to have been a small quantity, may even have been included in processed baby food and beef stock cubes.

The mince and burgers would have been eaten in schools or available as economy lines from supermarkets. Many of the burgers were sold at fairs and football matches.

As much as 50 per cent of cheap mince was made up from head meat, which was used heavily in schools and hospitals.

The report points out: 'Institutional buyers, such as schools and hospitals... put constant pressure on suppliers to reduce prices.

'There were only so many ways this could be achieved - one of which was using bovine MRM. In addition, head meat would have been a standard ingredient.'

The report comes in spite of what appeared to be a concerted attempt by the processing industry to keep details secret.

A year ago, the Government's BSE expert committee, SEAC, complained that manufacturers had stalled and blocked all attempts to get information on the use of MRM.

Eventually it asked the FSA to launch an inquiry, which involved face-to-face meetings with industry executives, many now retired.

While all the MRM and head meat carried a theoretical risk, only about 10 per cent would have come from older animals, those most likely to carry infection.

SEAC chairman, Professor Peter Smith, said last night: 'This study goes a long way to confirm what we suspected. A lot of individuals will have been exposed to this meat.'

The findings will be studied by scientists at the CJD suveillance unit in Edinburgh and the use of beef 'head meat' will be further explored. It is banned in Britain and Portugal but is still used in other EU states.



Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-142241/Horror-BSE-school-dinner-risk.html#ixzz1p6KDEO7Y




http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2012/03/beyond-pink-slime/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=120314




J Cancer Epidemiol Prev. 2002;7(2):59-70.

UK dietary exposure to BSE in beef mechanically recovered meat: by birth cohort and gender.

Cooper JD, Bird SM.

Source

MRC Biostatistics Unit, Cambridge, UK.



Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Meat recovered mechanically from bovine vertebral columns for use in burgers, sausages and other meat products may have been contaminated with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) from recovered spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia (DRG). We quantified UK exposure to BSE in beef mechanically recovered meat (MRM) by birth cohort (born pre-1940, in 1940-1969, post-1969), gender and calendar period (1980-1989, 1990-1996) because information on any two of BSE exposure intensity, vCJD incubation period and the new cases of vCJD tells us about the third.



METHODS:

Synthesis of evidence on BSE epidemiology, MRM production, infectivity in spinal cord and DRG, and UK dietary consumption.



FINDINGS:

Production of beef MRM peaked at 5000 tonnes in 1987, was nil in 1989 but recovered to 2000 tonnes in 1995 when it ceased altogether; reportedly 90% was used in burgers. Mean weight of spinal cord recovered per carcass was 3.3 g (95% credible interval 0.24-12.02 g) before the specified bovine offal (SBO) legislation and 1.5 g (0.02-8.30 g) after the legislation; whereas recovered weight of DRG (as infectious as spinal cord) was 27 g. Recovery of spinal cord from 1-year pre-clinical bovines peaked in 1988 at 238 g and of DRG in 1993 at 4250 g (medians). Median infectivity (5th and 95th percentiles) consumed in beef MRM was 33 250 (30 550-35 950), 65 600 (60 250-71 050) and 14 350 (13 150-15 600) bovine oral (Bo) ID50 units for the post-1969, 1940-1969 and pre-1940 birth cohorts in 1980-1989; and 44 250 (41 300-47 350), 39 600 (37 100-42,400) and 8750 (8100-9350) Bo ID50 units in 1990-1996. Males consumed almost 58% of infectivity in both periods. If the worst-case level of infectivity pertained, exposure, instead of halving in 1990-1996, would be sustained at around its 1980-1989 level for the two older birth cohorts and would have doubled in 1990-1996 for the post-1969 birth cohort.



INTERPRETATION:

SBO legislation in 1989 contributed only a 6% reduction in the infectivity in beef MRM. Salient sensitivity issues are highlighted.



http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12501956






Comment:



Para 72 and following sections



Mechanically recovered meat: Should you not suggest more urgent action over mechanically recovered meat, given that this seems to be the route of infection for vCJD?



It is all very well to have the 1995 controls in the UK, but are they 100 per cent effective? How can a consumer know if a product contains MRM from another country, where there may be either no, or very ineffective, controls?



Having read your report and the BSE Inquiry report, I suggest there is doubt about whether MRM can be safely eaten. It is very hard to be sure exactly what is in MRM and whether it is safe. Given this, your advice should surely be to advise consumers not to eat products which may contain MRM but to stick to cuts of meat which are clearly identifiable. It is often children who eat these MRM products.



I don`t know if there is the possibility to reply to these questions. I tried speaking to someone in your press office but he just quoted the report at me, which I can read very well for myself.ct contains MRM from another country, where there may be either no, or very ineffective, controls?



Having read your report and the BSE Inquiry report, I suggest there is doubt about whether MRM can be safely eaten. It is very hard to be sure exactly what is in MRM and whether it is safe. Given this, your advice should surely be to advise consumers not to eat products which may contain MRM but to stick to cuts of meat which are clearly identifiable. It is often children who eat these MRM products.



I don`t know if there is the possibility to reply to these questions. I tried speaking to someone in your press office but he just quoted the report at me, which I can read very well for myself.





http://www.food.gov.uk/archived/bsearchive/aboutbsetse/aboutsbereviewarchive/correspondence/say39








PLEASE NOTE IN REFERENCE TO THE LATEST LONG TERM USDA DOWNER COW SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM CASE STUDY FOR VCJD IN CHILDREN UK AND USA


Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (Variant) and Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (Prion Diseases) Description Since 1996, strong evidence has accumulated for a causal relationship between ongoing outbreaks, primarily in Europe, of a disease in cattle called bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE, or “mad cow disease”) and a disease in humans called variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD). Both disorders, which are caused by an unconventional transmissible agent, are invariably fatal brain diseases with incubation periods typically measured in years (1). Transmission of the BSE agent to humans, leading to vCJD, is believed to occur via ingestion of cattle products contaminated with the BSE agent; the specific foods associated with this transmission are unknown. However, a recently published case-control study involving 132 vCJD cases in the United Kingdom (UK) showed evidence of an increased risk for vCJD associated with the frequency of consuming beef products likely to contain mechanically recovered meat and head meat (such as burgers, meat pies, and sausages) (2). Bioassays and molecular tests have enabled identification of what World Health Organization consultants have classified as “high-infectivity” and “lower infectivity” tissues of cattle with BSE (3). The high-infectivity tissues include the brain, spinal cord, retina, optic nerve, and dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia, suggesting that these tissues can pose a relatively high risk of transmission. The lower infectivity tissues include peripheral nerves (e.g., sciatic and facial nerves), tonsils, nictitating membrane (third eye lid), distal ileum, bone marrow, and possibly thigh muscle. The latter tissue from one cow with BSE transmitted disease to highly BSE-sensitive transgenic mice at a rate indicative of trace levels of infectivity.



http://wwwn.cdc.gov/travel/yellowBoo...antPrions.aspx







url NOW GONE. DOCUMENT REMOVED FROM WEB...





Chapter 4 Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (Variant) and Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (Prion Diseases) Not Included in the 2010 Edition


The section "Chapter 4 Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (Variant) and Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (Prion Diseases)" in CDC Health Information for International Travel 2008 was not included in the 2010 edition. For information about global disease occurrence, please see


http://wwwn.cdc.gov/travel/content/diseases.aspx#BSE.







Sunday, May 18, 2008


BSE, CJD, and Baby foods (the great debate 1999 to 2005)


http://bseinquiry.blogspot.com/2008/05/bse-cjd-and-baby-foods-great-debate.html






Subject: SV: SV: Changes to UK Rendering System?

From: Karin.Irgens@DYREHELSETILSYNET.NO

Reply-To: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

Date: Fri, 1 Dec 2000 22:11:59 +0100 Content-Type: text/plain Parts/Attachments: text/plain (58 lines)

######### Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy #########

Hello John


Although MRM was probably one of the most important sources of contamination of human foods until it was banned in 1995 in the UK, the MRM problem has nothing to do with rendering and MBM for animal feed.

Besides, I doubt that it would be very practical to _extract_ brain and spinal cord after "crushing and shattering" of heads and spines !

According to the BSE Inquiry's final report, MRM was produced by :


..." high pressure being applied to bones to separate them from anything that was still adhering. The resultant slurry was used in a range of meat products for human consumption, including lower grade sausages, burgers an pies. The major source of MRM was the spinal column"...


The BSE Inquiry certainly drew attention to this process. I think they even wrote a "draft factual account" on MRM last year.


Best regards, Karin




-----Opprinnelig melding-----




Fra: john hazelwood: j_hazelwood@YAHOO.COM]


Sendt: 1. desember 2000 18:17



BSE-L@UNI-KARLSRUHE.DE



Emne: Re: SV: Changes to UK Rendering System?

TRUE But The UK invented MRM in the mid-nineteen

seventies, that is the industrial processing of whole

heads of cows and sheep plus skeletal waste on a huge

scale. The process was made viable by the collection

of hundreds of heads etc. That were then crushed,

shattered and centrifuged to extract the brains,

tongues, eyes, and spinal chord from the bone matrix.

A material was made from this slurry that could be

added to pies, sausages, burgers and baby filler as

cheap filler. The balance was used as a protein

supplement in animal feed.




Could you have a better way of spreading infectivity?

Did the BSE Inquiry describe or draw attention to

this process? I understand there was a HMSO

publication on MRM in 1980 but as yet I have not been

able to obtain a copy.




Best regards john


__________________________________________________



############ http://mailhost.rz.uni-karlsruhe.de/warc/bse-l.html

############

############ http://mailhost.rz.uni-karlsruhe.de/warc/bse-l.html ############



SNIP...



Subject: Re: SV: SV: Changes to UK Rendering System?

From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."

Reply-To: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

Date: Tue, 5 Dec 2000 11:39:50 -0800 Content-Type: text/plain Parts/Attachments: text/plain (253 lines)

######### Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy #########


Karin and John,


forgot to add this;


57. On 22 June 1990, the APS/Parliamentary Secretary (Mr Curry) sent a minute to Dr Denner, copied to Mr Capstick, Mr Meldrum, Mr Crawford, Mr Baker, Mr Griffiths, Mr Lawrence and others, in which he explained that at a demonstration of the MRM process which Mr Curry had seen at a slaughterhouse, traces of spinal tissue had been found in the product and as a result the Parliamentary Secretary was ‘very unhappy about MRM’.[53] A suggestion had been made to Mr Curry that an efficient method of removing the spinal tissue would be to apply a suction pump to the spinal canal after the head had been removed and before the carcase was split. The Parliamentary Secretary asked for a short note on the feasibility of such a method.


58. On 25 June 1990, Mr Bremner sent a minute to Mr Meldrum, copied to Dr Denner, Mr Crawford, Mr D Taylor and Mr Griffiths. Mr Bremner reported that he was ‘very surprised’ that the Parliamentary Secretary had seen traces of spinal tissue in MRM and that ‘it is so unlikely that I suspect he was misinformed’.[54] Mr Bremner explained that what the slaughterhouse operators had said was that ‘they were not happy to sell MRM because of the risk of contamination of the vertebrae with the spinal cord. Unfortunately not all the spinal cord was being removed by the meat inspectors although only small pieces were left’. He went on to say that although the idea of using a suction pump was being pushed by the operators, he found it difficult to imagine how it would work, and that ‘my own view was that if the meat inspectors had done their job correctly, there would have been little risk and if the vertebrae were excluded from MRM, there should be no further risk’.


59. In a manuscript minute dated 28 June 1990, Mr Meldrum asked Mr Bremner to find out from his trade contacts whether any suction pumps were actually available on the market.[55]


60. Dr Denner wrote to APS/Mr Curry on 26 June 1990 regarding the visit to Canvin International Ltd. His minute was copied to PS/Minister, Private Offices, Mr Capstick, Mr Packer, Mr Meldrum, Mrs Attridge, Mr Wentworth, Mr Crawford, Mr Baker, Mr Griffiths and Mr Lawrence amongst others.[56] Dr Denner explained that:- ‘There are two separate issues arising from the Parliamentary Secretary’s (Mr Curry) visit to the abattoir. The first is the efficacy of removing spinal cord from the carcase, which is a mandatory requirement of the Bovine Offals (Prohibition) Regulations 1989. This issue is related to other problems of abattoir practice such as the removal of the head meat and brains from cattle heads, and the prevention of cross contamination from spinal fluids and tissue during carcase dressing. The second problem is the safety of MRM prepared from spinal column bones. Since legislation already exists for the removal of spinal cord, any further consideration must stem from the risk posed by using spinal column with the spinal cord removed in MRM piston type machines. Any policy decision on BSE must be based on the best technical evidence available to be consistent with previous MAFF policy. The CVO is already organising a study to improve abattoir practice of splitting carcases. The use of a suction tube for removal of spinal cord after splitting the carcase is an effective technique already in use in some plants producing MRM from lamb spinal column bones. This may be one of several possible techniques that can be studied. I understand the Tyrrell Committee will discuss the use of spinal column in the preparation of MRM at their next meeting on 2 July. Subject to their recommendation, Food Science Division would be prepared to commission a study into verifying whether central nervous system fluid or tissue is extracted into MRM during the preparation in piston type machines when spinal column with the cord removed is used. The results of such a study would give Ministers the basis for any further action.’


61. The APS/Mr Curry replied to Dr Denner on 2 July 1990[57]. She explained that:- ‘The MRM [at Canvins] was produced using a machine which used a piston under hydraulic pressure. The traces of spinal tissue were identified by eye by Canvin’s vet. However, Mr Bremner - who accompanied the Parliamentary Secretary on this visit - said that it was possible that the material in question could have been cartilage tissue. Mr Bremner felt that the machine was not working properly as the MRM it produced was in larger pieces than normal.’


MRMs



http://www.bse.org.uk/dfa/dfa14.htm









http://bseinquiry.blogspot.com/2008/05/bse-inquiry-draft-factual-account-dfa.html






MECHANICALLY RECOVERED MEAT MRM


http://collections.europarchive.org/tna/20090505194948/http://bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1996/01/22008001.pdf




http://collections.europarchive.org/tna/20090505194948/http://bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1996/01/29010001.pdf




http://collections.europarchive.org/tna/20090505194948/http://bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1996/02/16008001.pdf







Mad cow disease, or bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), 1st emerged in Britain in 1986 as a result of "cannibalism," when beef offal was fed to cattle, which are natural grass-eaters. The proteins, called prions, that cause BSE were found in large quantities in the brains, spinal cords and spleens of cattle (although they were also subsequently discovered in meat tissue). When animal carcasses were ground down to form feed stuff for other cattle, prions were passed on. They then colonised the brains of the cattle which ate them, and were passed to humans via cheap, mechanically recovered meat -- such as processed sinews and offal that were used at the time in school dinners and baby food. In humans, the prions triggered the development of a new form of fatal human dementia called new variant CJD, which was 1st identified in 1996.




http://www.promedmail.org/direct.php?id=20111107.3317





Mad cow disease, or bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), 1st emerged in Britain in 1986 as a result of "cannibalism," when beef offal was fed to cattle, which are natural grass-eaters. The proteins,called prions, that cause BSE were found in large quantities in the brains, spinal cords and spleens of cattle (although they were alsosubsequently discovered in meat tissue). When animal carcasses were ground down to form feed stuff for other cattle, prions were passed on. They then colonised the brains of the cattle which ate them, and were passed to humans via cheap, mechanically recovered meat – such as processed sinews and offal that were used at the time in school dinners and baby food. In humans, the prions triggered the development of a new form of fatal human dementia called new variant CJD, which was 1st identified in 1996.



http://apex.oracle.com/pls/otn/f?p=2400:1001:6055737985757108::NO::F2400_P1001_BACK_PAGE,F2400_P1001_PUB_MAIL_ID:1011,91026







People who ate such products are thought to be at greater risk of developing the fatal brain disease vCJD, the human form of BSE. This is because mechanically recovered meat (MRM) from cows is scraped from the bone and is likely to include tissue from the nervous system.



http://downercattle.blogspot.com/2010/05/mad-cow-slurry-fed-to-school-children.html






-------- Original Message --------

Subject: Re: American Beef Supply at Risk

Date: Fri, 23 May 2003 17:11:59 –0500

From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr." flounder@wt.net

Reply-To: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy BSE-L@uni-karlsruhe.de

To: BSE-L@uni-karlsruhe.de


snip...



PLUS we must not let them forget about the real possibility of BSE going
back to sheep, even if you don't believe that some or all phenotypes of
scrapie do not transmit to man (without ever testing), even though they
transmit to primates.

In the UK, they had an SRM ban (not very well enforced) since 1989, and
MRM ban since 1995. In the USA they still have no adequate ban in 2003,
no adequate surveillance system in 2003.

WHEN will there be BSE/CJD-Inquiries in Canada and USA?

WHEN will they make CJD reportable Nationally and issue
a CJD Questionnaire to each victims family?

WHEN will they start rapid TSE/BSE testing cattle in
numbers suffient to find them (1 Million annually for 5 years)?

WHEN will the FDA reply to my FOIA request of _all_
ruminant-to-ruminant feed ban violations as asked?




snip...end...tss



From - Tue Jan 09 13:46:44 2001

From: "Sandy Blakeslee" sblakeslee@mindspring.com

To: flounder@wt.net

Subject: fda conference Date: Tue, 9 Jan 2001 12:27:06 –0700


Terry -- I understand you taped and listened in on the FDA conference
today. I missed it. I'm writing an update on BSE in the US for my paper
(NYTimes) and would like to know what was discussed today. Might I call
you? Where can I reach you? Sandy



Sandra Blakeslee


blakes@nytimes.com





505 982 xxxx

Subject: Re: BSE 50 STATE CONFERENCE CALL thread from BSE List and FDA Posting of cut version...

Date: Thu, 11 Jan 2001 22:02:47 -0700 From:

"Sandy Blakeslee" sblakeslee@mindspring.com

To: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr." References: 1


Hi terry -- thanks for all your help. I know it made a difference with the FDA getting out that release.


----- Original Message -----

From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr." flounder@wt.net

To:sblakeslee@mindspring.com

Sent: Thursday, January 11, 2001 2:06 PM

Subject: BSE 50 STATE CONFERENCE CALL thread from BSE List and FDA Posting of cut version...


snip...see ;







U.S.A. 50 STATE BSE MAD COW CONFERENCE CALL Jan. 9, 2001




http://tseac.blogspot.com/2011/02/usa-50-state-bse-mad-cow-conference.html







WHAT MAD COW FEED BAN ??? THAT MAD COW TRIPLE FIRE WALL WAS NOTHING BUT INK ON PAPER $$$



10,000,000+ LBS. of PROHIBITED BANNED MAD COW FEED I.E. BLOOD LACED MBM IN COMMERCE USA 2007

Date: March 21, 2007 at 2:27 pm PST

RECALLS AND FIELD CORRECTIONS: VETERINARY MEDICINES -- CLASS II

___________________________________

PRODUCT

Bulk cattle feed made with recalled Darling's 85% Blood Meal, Flash Dried, Recall # V-024-2007

CODE

Cattle feed delivered between 01/12/2007 and 01/26/2007

RECALLING FIRM/MANUFACTURER

Pfeiffer, Arno, Inc, Greenbush, WI. by conversation on February 5, 2007.

Firm initiated recall is ongoing.

REASON

Blood meal used to make cattle feed was recalled because it was cross- contaminated with prohibited bovine meat and bone meal that had been manufactured on common equipment and labeling did not bear cautionary BSE statement.

VOLUME OF PRODUCT IN COMMERCE

42,090 lbs.

DISTRIBUTION

WI

___________________________________

PRODUCT

Custom dairy premix products: MNM ALL PURPOSE Pellet, HILLSIDE/CDL Prot- Buffer Meal, LEE, M.-CLOSE UP PX Pellet, HIGH DESERT/ GHC LACT Meal, TATARKA, M CUST PROT Meal, SUNRIDGE/CDL PROTEIN Blend, LOURENZO, K PVM DAIRY Meal, DOUBLE B DAIRY/GHC LAC Mineral, WEST PIONT/GHC CLOSEUP Mineral, WEST POINT/GHC LACT Meal, JENKS, J/COMPASS PROTEIN Meal, COPPINI - 8# SPECIAL DAIRY Mix, GULICK, L-LACT Meal (Bulk), TRIPLE J - PROTEIN/LACTATION, ROCK CREEK/GHC MILK Mineral, BETTENCOURT/GHC S.SIDE MK-MN, BETTENCOURT #1/GHC MILK MINR, V&C DAIRY/GHC LACT Meal, VEENSTRA, F/GHC LACT Meal, SMUTNY, A- BYPASS ML W/SMARTA, Recall # V-025-2007

CODE

The firm does not utilize a code - only shipping documentation with commodity and weights identified.

RECALLING FIRM/MANUFACTURER

Rangen, Inc, Buhl, ID, by letters on February 13 and 14, 2007. Firm initiated recall is complete.

REASON

Products manufactured from bulk feed containing blood meal that was cross contaminated with prohibited meat and bone meal and the labeling did not bear cautionary BSE statement.

VOLUME OF PRODUCT IN COMMERCE

9,997,976 lbs.

DISTRIBUTION

ID and NV

END OF ENFORCEMENT REPORT FOR MARCH 21, 2007

http://www.fda.gov/bbs/topics/enforce/2007/ENF00996.html


NEW URL

http://www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls/EnforcementReports/2007/ucm120446.htm



Thursday, March 19, 2009

MILLIONS AND MILLIONS OF POUNDS OF MAD COW FEED IN COMMERCE USA WITH ONGOING 12 YEARS OF DENIAL

http://madcowfeed.blogspot.com/2009/03/millions-and-millions-of-pounds-of-mad.html



Tuesday, March 2, 2010

Animal Proteins Prohibited in Ruminant Feed/Adulterated/Misbranded Rangen Inc 2/11/10 USA

http://madcowfeed.blogspot.com/2010/03/animal-proteins-prohibited-in-ruminant.html



Monday, March 1, 2010

ANIMAL PROTEIN I.E. MAD COW FEED IN COMMERCE A REVIEW 2010

http://madcowfeed.blogspot.com/2010/03/animal-protien-ie-mad-cow-feed-in.html



Saturday, November 6, 2010

TAFS1 Position Paper on Position Paper on Relaxation of the Feed Ban in the EU

Berne, 2010 TAFS INTERNATIONAL FORUM FOR TRANSMISSIBLE ANIMAL DISEASES AND FOOD SAFETY a non-profit Swiss Foundation

http://madcowfeed.blogspot.com/2010/11/tafs1-position-paper-on-position-paper.html



Archive Number 20101206.4364 Published Date 06-DEC-2010 Subject PRO/AH/EDR>

Prion disease update 2010 (11) PRION DISEASE UPDATE 2010 (11)

http://www.promedmail.org/direct.php?id=20101206.4364




Sunday, February 5, 2012 February 2012

Update on Feed Enforcement Activities to Limit the Spread of BSE

http://transmissiblespongiformencephalopathy.blogspot.com/2012/02/february-2012-update-on-feed.html






New York Firm Recalls Beef Carcass That Contains Prohibited Materials Recall Release CLASS II RECALL FSIS-RC-003-2010 HEALTH RISK: LOW


Congressional and Public Affairs (202) 720-9113 Atiya Khan


WASHINGTON, January 15, 2010 - Jerry Hayes Meats Inc., a Newark Valley, N.Y., establishment is recalling approximately 490 pounds of a beef carcass that may not have had the spinal column removed, which is not compliant with regulations that require the removal of spinal cord and vertebral column from cattle over 30 months of age, the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.


Spinal cord and vertebral column are considered a specified risk material (SRM) and must be removed from cattle over 30 months of age in accordance with FSIS regulations. SRMs are tissues that are known to contain the infective agent in cattle infected with Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE), as well as materials that are closely associated with these potentially infective tissues. Therefore, FSIS prohibits SRMs from use as human food to minimize potential human exposure to the BSE agent.


The products subject to recall include: 1- "BEEF CARCASS," which bears the establishment number "EST. 04488 M" inside the USDA mark of inspection.


The product was packed on January 7, 2010, and sold to a single customer in New York.


The problem was discovered through routine FSIS inspection activities. FSIS has received no reports of illnesses associated with consumption of this product.


FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers (including restaurants) of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers.


Media and consumers with questions about the recall should contact the company's owner, Jerry Hayes at (607) 642-9598.


Consumers with food safety questions can "Ask Karen," the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from l0 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. #







FSIS


ADVANCED MEAT RECOVERY USING BEEF VERTEBRAL RAW MATERIALS


I. PURPOSE


Based on the first several months of regulatory (monitoring and follow-up surveillance) sampling, FSIS has determined that some establishments are not adequately addressing the presence of spinal cord tissue in boneless comminuted beef. FSIS is reissuing this directive to define more fully than it did in the initial directive the range of follow-up actions available to the Agency when product from an advanced meat recovery (AMR) system contains spinal cord tissue. This directive continues to provide inspection program personnel with instructions for sampling when a request is received from the Office of Public Health and Science (OPHS). NOTE: This directive only addresses the presence of spinal cord tissue. Other issues, such as calcium levels and the matters addressed in FSIS Directive 7160.1 and 7160.2, remain unchanged.







January 20, 2006: 11:32 AM EST


TOKYO (CNN) - Japan halted the import of U.S. beef Friday after animal spines were found in three boxes of frozen beef at Tokyo International Airport and asked U.S. officials to explain what happened.









Japan finds banned spine in U.S. beef: report April 23, 2008|MarketWatch NEW YORK (MarketWatch) -- Japan's farm ministry said Wednesday that a spinal cord had been found in a box of beef shipped from United States, in breach of the two countries' bilateral beef trade accord, the Associated Press reported.









Japan suspends U.S. plant's beef amid mad cow fears NationalOct. 10, 2009 - 03:41PM JST( 47 )


TOKYO —


Japan has suspended beef shipments from an American meatpacking plant after finding cattle parts banned under an agreement to prevent the spread of mad cow disease, the agriculture ministry said Saturday.


Japanese quarantine inspectors found bovine spinal columns in one of 732 boxes sent by Tyson Fresh Meats, Inc, which arrived in Japan last month, the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries said in a statement. The box contained 35 pounds (16 kilograms) of chilled short loin with spinal bones, which were not released commercially, said ministry official Goshi Nakata.







Tuesday, July 1, 2008


Missouri Firm Recalls Cattle Heads That Contain Prohibited Materials SRMs







Sunday, October 18, 2009


Wisconsin Firm Recalls Beef Tongues That Contain Prohibited Materials SRM WASHINGTON, October 17, 2009







Thursday, October 15, 2009


Nebraska Firm Recalls Beef Tongues That Contain Prohibited Materials SRM WASHINGTON, Oct 15, 2009







Thursday, June 26, 2008


Texas Firm Recalls Cattle Heads That Contain Prohibited Materials







Friday, August 8, 2008


Texas Firm Recalls Cattle Heads That Contain Prohibited Materials SRMs 941,271 pounds with tonsils not completely removed







Saturday, April 5, 2008


SRM MAD COW RECALL 406 THOUSAND POUNDS CATTLE HEADS WITH TONSILS KANSAS







Wednesday, April 30, 2008


Consumption of beef tongue: Human BSE risk associated with exposure to lymphoid tissue in bovine tongue in consideration of new research findings







Wednesday, April 30, 2008


Consumption of beef tongue: Human BSE risk associated with exposure to lymphoid tissue in bovine tongue in consideration of new research findings







Friday, October 15, 2010


BSE infectivity in the absence of detectable PrPSc accumulation in the tongue and nasal mucosa of terminally diseased cattle







SPECIFIED RISK MATERIALS SRMs









October 2009 O.11.3 Infectivity in skeletal muscle of BASE-infected cattle


Silvia Suardi1, Chiara Vimercati1, Fabio Moda1, Ruggerone Margherita1, Ilaria Campagnani1, Guerino Lombardi2, Daniela Gelmetti2, Martin H. Groschup3, Anne Buschmann3, Cristina Casalone4, Maria Caramelli4, Salvatore Monaco5, Gianluigi Zanusso5, Fabrizio Tagliavini1 1Carlo Besta" Neurological Institute,Italy; 2IZS Brescia, Italy; 33FLI Insel Riems, D, Germany; 4CEA-IZS Torino, Italy; 5University of Verona, Italy


Background: BASE is an atypical form of bovine spongiform encephalopathy caused by a prion strain distinct from that of BSE. Upon experimental transmission to cattle, BASE induces a previously unrecognized disease phenotype marked by mental dullness and progressive atrophy of hind limb musculature. Whether affected muscles contain infectivity is unknown. This is a critical issue since the BASE strain is readily transmissible to a variety of hosts including primates, suggesting that humans may be susceptible.


Objectives: To investigate the distribution of infectivity in peripheral tissues of cattle experimentally infected with BASE. Methods: Groups of Tg mice expressing bovine PrP (Tgbov XV, n= 7-15/group) were inoculated both i.c. and i.p. with 10% homogenates of a variety of tissues including brain, spleen, cervical lymph node, kidney and skeletal muscle (m. longissimus dorsi) from cattle intracerebrally infected with BASE. No PrPres was detectable in the peripheral tissues used for inoculation either by immunohistochemistry or Western blot.


Results: Mice inoculated with BASE-brain homogenates showed clinical signs of disease with incubation and survival times of 175±15 and 207±12 days. Five out of seven mice challenged with skeletal muscle developed a similar neurological disorder, with incubation and survival times of 380±11 and 410±12 days. At present (700 days after inoculation) mice challenged with the other peripheral tissues are still healthy. The neuropathological phenotype and PrPres type of the affected mice inoculated either with brain or muscle were indistinguishable and matched those of Tgbov XV mice infected with natural BASE.


Discussion: Our data indicate that the skeletal muscle of cattle experimentally infected with BASE contains significant amount of infectivity, at variance with BSE-affected cattle, raising the issue of intraspecies transmission and the potential risk for humans. Experiments are in progress to assess the presence of infectivity in skeletal muscles of natural BASE.







Sunday, February 5, 2012


February 2012 Update on Feed Enforcement Activities to Limit the Spread of BSE







Wednesday, March 7, 2012


Case-control study of cases of bovine spongiform encephalopathy born after July 31, 1996 (BARB cases) in Great Britain Veterinary Record doi:10.1136/vr.100097







Wednesday, March 7, 2012


The epidemiology of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in the Republic of Ireland before and after the reinforced feed ban



















Harvard Risk Assessment of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Update, October 31, 2005 INTRODUCTION The United States Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) held a public meeting on July 25, 2006 in Washington, D.C. to present findings from the Harvard Risk Assessment of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Update, October 31, 2005 (report and model located on the FSIS website:

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/Science/Risk_Assessments/index.asp).



Comments on technical aspects of the risk assessment were then submitted to FSIS.

Comments were received from Food and Water Watch, Food Animal Concerns Trust (FACT), Farm Sanctuary, R-CALF USA, Linda A Detwiler, and Terry S. Singeltary.

This document provides itemized replies to the public comments received on the 2005 updated Harvard BSE risk assessment. Please bear the following points in mind:

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/PDF/BSE_Risk_Assess_Response_Public_Comments.pdf





Owens, Julie From: Terry S. Singeltary Sr. [mailto:flounder9%40verizon.net]

Sent: Monday, July 24, 2006 1:09 PM

To: FSIS RegulationsComments

Subject: [Docket No. FSIS-2006-0011] FSIS Harvard Risk Assessment of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) Page 1 of 98

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/OPPDE/Comments/2006-0011/2006-0011-1.pdf




FSIS, USDA, REPLY TO SINGELTARY


http://www.fsis.usda.gov/PDF/BSE_Risk_Assess_Response_Public_Comments.pdf




Monday, October 10, 2011

EFSA Journal 2011 The European Response to BSE: A Success Story

snip...

EFSA and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) recently delivered a scientific opinion on any possible epidemiological or molecular association between TSEs in animals and humans (EFSA Panel on Biological Hazards (BIOHAZ) and ECDC, 2011). This opinion confirmed Classical BSE prions as the only TSE agents demonstrated to be zoonotic so far but the possibility that a small proportion of human cases so far classified as "sporadic" CJD are of zoonotic origin could not be excluded. Moreover, transmission experiments to non-human primates suggest that some TSE agents in addition to Classical BSE prions in cattle (namely L-type Atypical BSE, Classical BSE in sheep, transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME) and chronic wasting disease (CWD) agents) might have zoonotic potential.

snip...


http://www.efsa.europa.eu/en/efsajournal/pub/e991.htm?emt=1



http://www.efsa.europa.eu/en/efsajournal/doc/e991.pdf




see follow-up here about North America BSE Mad Cow TSE prion risk factors, and the ever emerging strains of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy in many species here in the USA, including humans ;


http://transmissiblespongiformencephalopathy.blogspot.com/2011/10/efsa-journal-2011-european-response-to.html




Thursday, August 12, 2010

Seven main threats for the future linked to prions

First threat

The TSE road map defining the evolution of European policy for protection against prion diseases is based on a certain numbers of hypotheses some of which may turn out to be erroneous. In particular, a form of BSE (called atypical Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy), recently identified by systematic testing in aged cattle without clinical signs, may be the origin of classical BSE and thus potentially constitute a reservoir, which may be impossible to eradicate if a sporadic origin is confirmed.

***Also, a link is suspected between atypical BSE and some apparently sporadic cases of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans. These atypical BSE cases constitute an unforeseen first threat that could sharply modify the European approach to prion diseases.

Second threat

snip...

http://www.neuroprion.org/en/np-neuroprion.html




Saturday, March 5, 2011

MAD COW ATYPICAL CJD PRION TSE CASES WITH CLASSIFICATIONS PENDING ON THE RISE IN NORTH AMERICA

http://transmissiblespongiformencephalopathy.blogspot.com/2011/03/mad-cow-atypical-cjd-prion-tse-cases.html




Sunday, February 12, 2012

National Prion Disease Pathology Surveillance Center Cases Examined1 (August 19, 2011) including Texas

http://transmissiblespongiformencephalopathy.blogspot.com/2012/02/national-prion-disease-pathology.html






Friday, March 09, 2012

Experimental H-type and L-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy in cattle: observation of two clinical syndromes and diagnostic challenges

Research article


http://bse-atypical.blogspot.com/2012/03/experimental-h-type-and-l-type-bovine.html




Thursday, February 16, 2012

Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy BSE

31 USA SENATORS ASK PRESIDENT OBAMA TO HELP SPREAD MAD COW DISEASE 2012

http://transmissiblespongiformencephalopathy.blogspot.com/2012/02/bovine-spongiform-encephalopathy-bse-31.html




Thursday, February 23, 2012

EIGHT FORMER SECRETARIES OF AGRICULTURE SPEAKING AT USDA'S 2012 AGRICULTURE OUTLOOK FORUM INDUCTED INTO USA MAD COW HALL OF SHAME

http://madcowusda.blogspot.com/2012/02/eight-former-secretaries-of-agriculture.html




Sunday, March 11, 2012


APHIS Proposes New Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Import Regulations in Line with International Animal Health Standards Proposal Aims to Ensure Health of the U.S. Beef Herd, Assist in Negotiations


http://transmissiblespongiformencephalopathy.blogspot.com/2012/03/aphis-proposes-new-bovine-spongiform.html






Terry S. Singeltary Sr. on the Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Public Health Crisis



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zf3lfz9NrT4



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c0tWkNvhO4g



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zf3lfz9NrT4&feature=results_main&playnext=1&list=PL780BE2AF0B62A944




full text with source references ;



http://transmissiblespongiformencephalopathy.blogspot.com/2011/08/terry-singeltary-sr-on-creutzfeldt.html






THE BRITISH DISEASE, IS NOW THE GLOBAL DISEASE


WARNING, this is a very disturbing video. over a decade old.


http://idzoomify1.uzh.ch:8080/zoomify/videos/video-009/video-009.html





PLEASE be aware, for 4 years, the USDA fed our children all across the Nation (including TEXAS) dead stock downer cows, the most high risk cattle for BSE aka mad cow disease and other dangerous pathogens.


who will watch our children for CJD for the next 5+ decades ???


WAS your child exposed to mad cow disease via the NSLP ???


SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM FROM DOWNER CATTLE UPDATE



http://downercattle.blogspot.com/2009/05/who-will-watch-children.html




http://downercattle.blogspot.com/





DID YOUR CHILD CONSUME SOME OF THESE DEAD STOCK DOWNER COWS, THE MOST HIGH RISK FOR MAD COW DISEASE ???


you can check and see here ;



http://www.fns.usda.gov/fns/safety/pdf/Hallmark-Westland_byState.pdf




layperson



Terry S. Singeltary Sr.
P.O. Box 42
Bacliff, Texas USA 77518
flounder9@verizon.net